www.RogerWendell.com
Roger J. Wendell
Defending 3.8 Billion Years of Organic EvolutionSM
Line

Antarctica!

Roger and Tami Wendell at Neko Harbour, Antarctica - 01-28-2011
Neko Harbour, Graham Land, Antarctica - photo by Nick Tozer
In early 2011 Tami and I had the distinct pleasure of participating in an OAT voyage to Antarctica aboard the M/V Clelia II! From the ship we made six separate landings along Graham Land, and adjacent islands, on the Antarctic Peninsula. We boarded the ship in Ushuaia, Argentina, the world's southernmost city, where we exited the Beagle Channel to make our way across the Drake Passage - sailing for just over two days to reach Antarctica.

I think I've heard it suggested that the "Drake ain't a lake, it's a shake!" Boy, whoever said that had it right! The Drake is considered the roughest stretch of water in the world due to the "Circumpolar Current" being squeezed through this relatively narrow (1,000 kilometre/600 mile) gap between the tip of South America and the Antarctic Peninsula. The current flows at 140 million cubic metres (tonnes) of water per second - or about the equivalent of 5,000 Amazon rivers or four times the size of the Gulf Stream. Combined with the strong winds that blow almost constantly, the Drake provided our group with seas that occasionally peaked at 4.5 metres (15 feet) - not huge by maritime standards but enough to keep me and 60% of my shipmates either vomiting or in bed!

Despite the Drake Passage we had a wonderful trip that included a really good look at Antarctica and its wildlife in addition to pleasant explorations of Argentina and Brazil on our way back home. The pictures, links, and text below should help tell the story - feel free to contact me with any questions!

- Roger J. Wendell
February 2011

 

 

Antarctic Treaty System

Our parents' generation did an extraordinary thing during the Cold War - they created the Antarctic Treaty. My own generation, in 1991, (during the 30 year referral period) agreed to not only extend the agreements but to expand the protections. Our own children and grandchildren will be challenged to continue the tradition (in light of a burgeoning human population and dwindling resourced) in 2041 when the Madrid Protocol review process begins...

For a definition, the Antarctic Treaty and related agreements, collectively called the Antarctic Treaty System or ATS, regulate international relations with respect to Antarctica, Earth's only continent without a native human population. For the purposes of the treaty system, Antarctica is defined as all of the land and ice shelves south of 60 degrees latitude. The treaty, entering into force in 1961 and eventually signed by 47 countries, sets aside Antarctica as a scientific preserve, establishes freedom of scientific investigation and bans military activity on that continent. The treaty was the first arms control agreement established during the Cold War.

The main treaty was opened for signature on December 1, 1959, and officially entered into force on June 23, 1961. The original signatories were the 12 countries active in Antarctica during the International Geophysical Year (IGY) of 1957-58. The 12 countries had significant interests in Antarctica at the time: Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Chile, France, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom and the United States. These countries had established over 50 Antarctic stations for the IGY. The treaty was a diplomatic expression of the operational and scientific cooperation that had been achieved "on the ice".

 

Line

 

Antarctica Ozone Hole 2000
2000 Ozone hole over Antarctica
M/V Clelia II Captain Gunna Roos

Chief Officer: Hristo Bogdanov
Hotel Manager: Stefan Kern
Chief Engineer: Valeriy Zakutny
Maitre D' Hotel: Gabor Ferencz
Chief Purser: Beatrix Sebe
Chef: Ariel Aranzanso
MV Clelia II Captain and Crew in Antarctica by Roger J. Wendell - 01-27-2011
Captain, officers, & crew
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -  

Expedition Leader: Ignacio Rojas

Expedition Staff: Claudia Roedel Juan Pablo Seco Pon
  Trevor Potts Berenice Charpin
  Peter Damish Chris Collins

OAT Trip Leaders: Nick Tozer Miguel Tuaszig
  Maria Copello Alicia Flores
Antarctica Expedition and OAT leaders aboard the MV Clelia II by Roger J. Wendell - 02-02-2011
OAT and Expedition leaders

 

Arrow Pointing Right Click Here for the Waypoints I collected while in Antarctica...

 (Click on any of this page's "thumbnail" images for a larger view)

Line

 

M/V Clelia II

As I mentioned above, we made our way to Antarctica aboard the expedition ship MV Clelia II out of Ushuaia (the world's southernmost city!). Throughout our voyage we found the Clelia II to be comfortable and in good repair. However, there were serious concerns before our departure that the ship may not be able to sail due to a high seas mishap just seven weeks earlier. On December 8th (2010) the Clelia II had to limp back to port after having lost an engine in a severe storm with 30 foot waves off the coast of Argentina. According to ship personnel, a rough wave broke through the bridge's windshield knocking out some of the engine controls. A year prior (December 26, 2009) the Clelia II went adrift in strong currents off Petermann Island and had to be pulled to safety by sister ship Corinthian II. Again, our own experience aboard the Clelia II was that of comfort and safety - despite 15 foot waves we were in no danger and completely enjoyed the experience (except for a bit of seasickness...).
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
1. Our huge closet!
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
2. Watching the sea
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
3. Our cabin
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
4. Calm seas
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
5. Rough seas
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
6. Seat belts!
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
7. Mandatory safety drill
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
8. Bridge
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
9. Satellite email @ $0.45 USD/min
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
10. Tug harbor guide
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
11. M/V Clelia II
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
12. M/V Clelia II
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
13. Teddy and Tami
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
14. Fine dining
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
15. Stairwell
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
16. Tami, Gabor, & Alicia
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
17. Stephen, Marilyn, Nick, Gary
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
18. Gary and Kay
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
19. Tami
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
20. MV Clelia II
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
21. Tami
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
22. Waiting to get back aboard
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
23. Tami
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
24. My constant companion!

YouTube Logo Click Here for a YouTube video of the Clelia II in calm water...
YouTube Logo Click Here for a YouTube video of the Clelia II in rough water...
YouTube Logo Click Here for my YouTube video of the Drake Passage outside our porthole...

 

Line

 

Zodiac boats

The use of these inflatable, Zodiac-style boats is how we made regular trips from the ship to the Antarctic shore each day. In a couple of the pictures, If you look closely, you can see a small mast and ball configuration at the rear of each Zodiac that's used to reflect radar signals so the rubber crafts can be identified. Sometimes the water was so rough we weren't able to safely enter the Zodiacs adjacent our ship - a common problem on the high seas and even inside the coastal inlets of Antarctica.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
25.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
26.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
27.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
28.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
29.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
30.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
31.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
32.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
33.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
34.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
35.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
36. Gretchen, Claudia, & Gary
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
37. Sandi, Betsy, Tami, Marilyn
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
38. Betsy, Tami, Marilyn
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
39. Sandi, Betsy & Tami
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
40. Nick & Tami
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
41. Kay & Gary
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
42. colleen & Tami
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
43. Aqil, Tami, & Gee
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
44. Gary
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
45. Tami
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
46. Me
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
47.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
48.

YouTube Logo Click Here for my YouTube video of our Zodiac ride...
YouTube Logo Click Here for another YouTube Zodiac video...

 

Line

 

Boot decontamination

In a 2011 .pdf file, the IAATO (International Association of Antarctica Tour Operators) states, "While there is presently no conclusive evidence that tourists have introduced or transmitted diseases or any alien material in Antarctica, there is indirect and circumstantial evidence that raises concerns. Further, there is acknowledged potential for visitors to be vectors of disease, both into and within the Antarctic ecosystem. The Antarctic tourism industry, on its own initiative, recognized these concerns nearly a decade ago and began implementing procedures to address the possible introduction of alien organisms into Antarctica." In response, our ship, and all the others we encountered in Antarctica, made a special effort to clean everyone's boots, pants, and other clothing anytime leaving or returning to the ship. We were also advised that these procedures reduced the possibility of contaminating one penguin colony with debris from another. Made sense to me!
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
49. Toilet brush
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
50. Boot storage
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
51. Disinfectant
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
52. Disinfectant
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
53. Our locker
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
54. Boot scraper
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
55. Clothing check!

YouTube Logo Click Here for my YouTube video of our boot cleaning...

 

Line

 

La Base Presidente Gabriel González Videla, Antarctica (Chile)

Antarctica has no permanent residents, but a number of governments maintain permanent manned research stations throughout the continent. The number of people conducting and supporting scientific research and other work on the continent and its nearby islands varies from about 1,000 in winter to about 5,000 in the summer. Many of the stations are staffed year-round, the winter-over personnel typically arriving from their home countries for a one-year assignment. The Antarctic summer, of course, also sees tens of thousands of tourists (like me and Tami!) with many bases welcoming visitors to showcase some research or museum, sell a few t-shirts, or maybe even exchange a visit to a ship for a different meal, supplies, or shower.

I suspect some countries, especially Chile and Argentina, maintain a greater presence on the continent because they believe their territorial claims supersede the ATS. Nevertheless, Base Presidente Gabriel González Videla and other locations welcomed us with open arms and genuine hospitality. Base Presidente Gabriel González Videla is also used to coordinate search and rescue efforts. Also, while we were on the base, I was invited to share a private drink and political discussion (be careful!) with the commanding officer - an especially memorable experience!

Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
56. Welcome to the base!
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
57.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
58.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
59. Museo
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
60.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
61.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
62.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
63. Lester & Bagshawe historical site
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
64. Leucistic Gentoo penguin
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
65.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
66.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
67.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
68. Me and a whale vertebrae
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
69. Lookout tower
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
70.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
71.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
72.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
73. Local brew!
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
74.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
75. Kay, Tami, & Bob
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
76.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
77.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
78.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
79.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
80.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
81.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
82.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
83.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
84.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
85.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
86.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
87.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
88.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
89. Peter Damish and Tami
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
90. Tami and the officer
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
91.

YouTube Logo Click Here for my YouTube video of penguins walking across Base Presidente Gabriel González Videla...
YouTube Logo Click Here for my YouTube video of the Drake Passage outside our porthole...
YouTube Logo Click Here for my YouTube video of us glissading at Neko Harbour...

 

Line

 

Port Lockroy, Antarctica (United Kingdom)

Port Lockroy is located in a natural harbor in the British Antarctic Territory. The 1904 French Antarctic Expedition discovered it in 1911 after which is was used for whaling between 1911 and 1931. The British military used is during World War II for "Operation Tabarin" - an effort to occupy certain parts of Antarctic territory to provide communications and maybe even a diversion activities during the war.

Port Lockroy was renovated in 1996 and is now a museum and post office where Tami and I mailed cards back to friends and family during our trip! Operated by the United Kingdom Antarctic Heritage Trust, Port Lockroy is designated as Historic Site # 61 under the Antarctic Treaty. Port Lockroy remains one of the most popular tourist destinations in Antarctica and uses funding from its small souvenir shop for upkeep of the site and museum. I especially enjoyed the display of old radio equipment and have posted an additional photo on my Morse code page.

Interesting to note, too, that Port Lockroy is conducting a penguin population study around their facility. So far, as of this posting, their unofficial findings are that human contact with Penguins may be increasing their population slightly. This might be due, in part, to the human presence scaring-off some of the predators that prey on the penguin chicks, etc. They estimate they'll have about 11,000 human visitors during 2011 season...

Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
92. Chris the greeter!
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
93. Tami
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
94. Kitchen
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
95.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
96.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
97. Radio room
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
98. Sleeping quarters
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
99.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
100. Ionospheric testing
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
101. Ionospheric testing
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
102. Spare parts
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
103.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
104.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
105. Volunteer staff housing
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
106. Bransfield House
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
107. Whale jawbone
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
108. Tami
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
109.

YouTube Logo Click Here for my YouTube video tour of Port Lockroy

 

Line

 

Whaler's Bay, Deception Island, Antarctica

Deception Island is the largest of three active volcanic centers in the South Shetlands. It is ring-shaped and 9 miles (14.5 kilometres) diameter, enclosing the large harbor of Port Foster, which is also the caldera of the ancient volcano. Captain Roos and his crew navigated the Clelia II through Neptune's Bellows, the narrow pass into the caldera. It was there then that we landed at Whaler's Bay where we viewed the remains of the Norwegian whaling station and hut that were evacuated in 1967 after the eruption of the volcano. Whaler's Bay is also where I took the "Polar Plunge."

Krill vs. Salps: Below you'll see an entire row of pictures of "Salps" that had washed ashore while we were in Whaler's Bay. These small creatures are in direct competition with Antarctic Krill. It appears the Salps are starting to gain on the Krill because warmer atmospheric temperatures are bringing more fresh water into the waters off Antarctica (i.e. the ice is melting). This, in turn, reduces the water's salinity which is more favorable to the Salps. Also related to this issue the amount of ice cover, underlying marine plankton, and each creature's ability to reproduce - a complex relationship I don't have time for here... Anyway, Krill and Salps are macrozooplankton grazers, occurring in vast, patchy swarms. Krill, in turn, provide food for whales, seabirds, penguins, fish, and many others. Salps, on the other hand, are much less nutritious and negatively affect the aforementioned food chain when their numbers increase at the expense of Krill.

Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
110. Tami & Nick
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
111. Neptune's Window
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
112.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
113. Seal
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
114. Chinstrap penguin
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
115. Chinstrap penguins
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
116. Hiking to Neptune's Window
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
117. Neptune's Window
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
118. Hiking to Neptune's Window
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
119. Us at Neptune's Window
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
120. Berenice pointing to moss/leichen
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
121. An Antarctic "forest!"
Salps at Whalers Bay, Antarctica by Roger J. Wendell - 01-31-2011
122. Salps
Salps at Whalers Bay, Antarctica by Roger J. Wendell - 01-31-2011
123. Salps
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
124. Krill
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
125. Salps
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
126. Berenice marks more Salps
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
127. Salsp
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
128. Starfish
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
129. Starfish
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
130. Tami & Roger
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
131. Station ruins
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
132. Whaling station ruins
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
133. Whale bones
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
134. Berenice, Tami, & Sandi
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
135. Nick Tozer looking for me...
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
136. Reluctant Polar Plunger
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
137. Coming back in
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
138. Beached whale...
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
139. Tami & Roger

YouTube Logo Click Here for my YouTube video of the thermal waters in Whaler's Bay...

 

Line

 

Hannah Point, Walker Bay, Livingston Island, Antarctica

Hannah Point lies in Walker Bay on the southern coast of Livingston Island. It is named after a sealing vessel that was shipwrecked at this site in 1820. The site is renowned for its abundant wildlife. This includes Chinstrap Penguins, BLue-Eyed Shags, Kelp Gulls, and the sometimes Macaroni Penguins and Elephant Seals.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
140.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
141.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
142.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
143.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
144.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
145. Seal
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
146. Dirty penguin
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
147. Tami, Bob, & Janice
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
148.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
149. Seals
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
150. Seals
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
151. Seals
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
152. Seals
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
153. Seals
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
154. Seals
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
155.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
156. Seals
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
157. Gastrointestinal distress?

YouTube Logo Click Here for my YouTube video of the Elephant Seals at Hannah Point...
YouTube Logo Click Here for a YouTube video of Chin Strap penguin walking by us...

 

Line

 

Trails

Penguins and other wildlife ALWAYS have the right-of-way on any trails (or anywhere else) in Antarctica. Human interference with the travel of wildlife can cause these creatures to expend extra, unnecessary energy that can actually endanger and weaken them in this harsh environment. Plus, obviously, anyone (human) visiting Antarctica isn't on much of a schedule so it's easy to just stand and wait for the penguins to pass - it's fun!
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
158. Tami waits
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
159.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
160.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
161.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
162.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
163.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
164.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
165.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
166.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
167.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
168.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
169. Chris Collins clears the trail

YouTube Logo Click Here for my YouTube video of a penguin crossing...

 

Line

 

Miscellanea

Antarctica is a magical place that deserves our protection if for no other reason than we've decimated so much of the rest of this small planet. Antarctica's interior is quiet, clean, clear, and free of anything artificial. Antarctica's coasts, peninsula, and islands are teaming with life and variety despite human s having destroyed so many seals and whales. Imagine a land that's nearly 1.5 times the size of the United States but completely void of crowds, highways, shopping malls, factories, and all the other clutter that continues to separate us from the natural world - and that's Antarctica, the last paradise on Earth!
- Roger J. Wendell, February 2011
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
170. Whale watching
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
171. Whales
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
172. Whales
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
173.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
174.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
175.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
176.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
177.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
178.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
179.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
180.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
181.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
182.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
183.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
184. Penguin waves goodbye...
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
185. Rocks...
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
186.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
187.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
188.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
189.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
190.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
191.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
192.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
193.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
194. Me
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
195. Us
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
196. Us
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
197. Juan Pablo Seco Pon
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
198. Me
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
199. Me
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
200. Seals floating by...
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
201.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
202.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
203. Penguins swiming
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
204.
Chinstrap Penguins at Whalers Bay, Antarctica by Roger J. Wendell - 01-31-2011
205. Chinstrap Penguins
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
206. Bundled Tami
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
207. Peter Dimish's hat!
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
208.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
209.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
210.
Antarctica Adventure by Roger J. Wendell - January and Feburary 2011
211.

YouTube Logo Click Here for a YouTube video of seals floating by us on the ice...
YouTube Logo Click Here for a YouTube video I took while glissading...
YouTube Logo Click Here for a YouTube video me on glissade as seen by Tami...

 

Line

 

¡ Certificado!
(signed proof that we were there!)

Tami Wendell survived the Drake Passage - 02-02-2011
Surviving the Drake Passage
Roger J. Wendell at Presidente_gabriel_gonzalez_videla_antarctica_01-29-2011
Presidente Gabriel González Videla
Roger J. Wendell Polar Plunge Whalers Bay, Antarctica - 01-31-2011
Polar Plunge

YouTube Logo Click Here for my YouTube video of the Polar Plunge...

 

Line

 

Species Checklist

On land and aboard ship wildlife viewing sessions were organized throughout each day. Tami and I took full advantage and participated in all of the ones we could (I missed a couple because I was too seasick...). The following is a "Species Checklist" that was compiled aboard ship. This list was recorded between January 25th and February 3rd so a lot of territory was covered. So, obviously, various species were viewed at different locations all along a journey that was well over 2,000 kilometres in length!
Birds
Gentoo Penguin
Chinstrap Penguin
Rockhopper Penguin
Macaroni Penguin
Magellanic Penguin
Wandering Albatros
Black-browed Albatros
Grey Headed Albatros
Southern Giant Petrel
Birds
Southern Fulmar
White-chinned Petrel
Antarctic Prion
Blue Petrel
Pintado (Cape) Petrel
Snow Petrel
WIlson's Storm Petrel
Black-bellied Storm Petrel
Blue-eyed Shag
Birds
Rock Shag
Snow Sheatbill
Brown Skua
Antarctic Skua
South Polar Skua
Kelp Gull
Dolphin Gull
South American Tern
Antarctic Tern
Mammals
Antarctic Fur Seal
Southern Elephant Seal
Weddell Seal
Crabeater Seal
Leopard Seal
Fin Whale
Sei Whale
Antarctic Minke Whale
Humpback Whale
Commerson's Dolphin

 

Line

 

Links:

  1. 12ers
  2. 13ers
  3. 14ers
  4. Aconcagua
  5. Africa (Eastern) - Kenya, Tanzania, and my Kilimanjaro climb
  6. Africa (Southern) - Our trip through Botswana, South Africa, Zambia, Zimbabwe
  7. Amazonia
  8. Antarctica Treaty System
  9. Argentina and Brazil
  10. Australia Main Page
  11. Australia Part Two Page
  12. Campint
  13. China
  14. CIA World Factbook on Antarctica
  15. Climbing
  16. Ecuador
  1. France
  2. Grand Canyon
  3. Hawai'i
  4. Hiking
  5. India
  6. Ireland
  7. Japan
  8. Mexico
  9. Russia
  10. San Francisco
  11. Silk Road
  12. Tibet
  13. Travel and Travel Two
  14. United Kingdom - England
  15. United Kingdom - Wales and Scotland
  16. Waypoints

 

Line

 

Back Back to Roger J. Wendell's Home Page...

Web Counter Logo

 

Abbey | About | Blog | Contacting Me | Copyright | Disclaimer | Donate | Guest Book | Home | Site Index | Solutions | Terms, Conditions and Fair Use
Copyright © 1955 -